Posts Tagged 'Psalm 146'

For June 9, 2013: Proper 5, Year C

The Reading            1 Kings 17:8-24

The first and second books of Kings tell the stories of the rulers of Israel, most of whom are not very faithful to God, and the prophets in those times, most of whom are faithful and often suffer for it. In today’s reading, the prophet Elijah goes outside of Israel and imposes on a widow who has fallen on very hard times that then get worse. Through his faithfulness and his compassion, God’s servant works a miracle.

Lection 1 pronunciation notes: “Zarephath” is ZARE-uh-fath; “Sidon” is SIGH-don

The Response            Psalm 146

“Put not your trust in rulers, nor in any child of earth, for there is no help in them.”

The Epistle            Galatians 1:11-24

The church at Galatia was a mix of Gentiles and converted Jews; this could cause friction when the Jews expected the Gentiles to follow Judaic practice. In today’s reading, the apostle Paul sets out his biography for the Galatians with the goal of establishing both his background as a really good Jew and the insignificance of his background when it comes to salvation, which is strictly God’s to give.

Lection 2 pronunciation notes: “Galatia” is gah-LAY-shah; “zealous” is ZELL-us; “Cephas” is SEE-fuss; “Cilicia” is sill-ISH-uh

The Gospel            Luke 7:11-17

“When the Lord saw her, he had compassion for her and said to her, ‘Do not weep.’”

Further thoughts

A thread that binds today’s readings together is of things not going according to plan.

The mourners in Nain know exactly where they are going and why and what will happen afterward: their friend and relative has died, so it is their duty to go get him properly buried, and then his mother is going to be destitute because that’s the way the world works. But other plans are in God’s works, and a fairly standard funeral procession turns into a unique celebration.

Saul of Tarsus knows exactly where he is going and why and what will happen afterward: he is going to save God’s people from the threat posed by people who keep preaching Jesus in spite of persecution; he will be a good guy in God’s eyes and a hero to Israel, because that’s the way the world should work. But other plans are in God’s works; the persecutor is turned around by the grace of God, and the proof that this is from God is that, though the message of grace is largely the same, Paul has absolutely not learned it from any human.

The widow of Zarephath knows exactly what she is doing and where it will end: she has no hope of protecting her son from dying of starvation, because that’s the way the world works, but she can at least feed him one last time before they starve together. But other plans are in God’s works, so the prophet from Israel says, and indeed he and they eat and live.

Elijah himself might be less certain. Zarephath, the first reading tells us, “belongs to Sidon”: it is not Israelite territory, and one senses that Elijah goes there only under orders. There, what he has heard from God comes to pass. So far, so good—but suddenly his hostess’s son sickens and dies. This is not in the script! Elijah seems in shock. He cries out at the injustice, then he does whatever comes into his head, and then he implores God… and, miraculously, the boy begins to breathe again, and grief and anger and self-blame give way to wonder.

That is precisely the message of Paul. Though my frailties and my losses bear down on me like the hand of grief on the mourners of Nain, like the hand of hunger on the widow of Zarephath, Jesus the merciful is ready to stop the bier with a touch, not because I deserve it but simply because, wherever I go and with whatever plans, I cannot help but be his.

For April 14, 2013: Celebration of New Ministry

The Reading            Numbers 11:16-17, 24-25a

The book of Numbers is the account of Israel’s progress out of Egypt to the land that God had promised. Today’s reading opens shortly after God’s own redeemed people have exasperated Moses again, this time by complaining about the menu. God’s prescription also works well for a population that is not fed up with manna.

The Response            Psalm 146

“He sustains the orphan and widow, but frustrates the way of the wicked.”

The Epistle            Ephesians 4:7-8, 11-16m

Scholars disagree on whether the letter to the Ephesians was written by the apostle Paul or even whether it was originally addressed to the church at Ephesus. There is little dispute, however, as to the importance of the teaching in today’s passage: we are called to welcome each other’s gifts and our own as we help build the church in the love of Christ. 

The Gospel            Luke 10:1-2

“‘Ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.’”

 

Further thoughts

The readings for today at St Alban’s Episcopal, El Cajon, depart from the normal course of the Revised Common Lectionary, Year C, to celebrate a return to normality: our church is officially inducting a new rector. The event will feature a blessing from the bishop of the diocese and an assortment of gifts to launch the new ministry. Most of the gifts are standard for an event of this type—a Bible and prayer book, vestments, oil for anointing, bread and wine and water. Some, however, are peculiar to our church; a food basket and school book, for our ministry to refugees; a shovel, for the community garden recently launched in conjunction with our near neighbors of First Presbyterian; the soup ladle, for our ministry of feeding the homeless. One final gift is specific to the new man: the Ecclesia cross, for a ministry without walls to the homeless in Boston that our transplanted-Easterner rector means to plant here. 

Today’s readings quite properly remind us that the sharing of gifts with our rector does not and must not stop today. To be sure, Fr. Dave faces rather fewer people than did Moses—it is easy to forget that the two censuses in the book of Numbers each counted over 600,000 Israelite men of fighting age, not counting the women, children, and Levites; seventy assistants to help with the Israelites’ fractiousness and grumbling doesn’t sound like much, until one realizes that Moses just acquired seventy times the help he’d had before. In any case, “seventy” tends to be Bible-ese for “a whole lot”, and perhaps this makes slightly better sense of the fact that the quantity of help that Yahweh orders in for Moses tallies with the quantity of help that Luke tells us Jesus ordered out to serve as his advance troops.

Whoever really did write the book of Ephesians sheds light on what we could call the Numbers numbers game. The larger the number of individuals who stand ready to offer their gifts, and the more willing they are to foster and recognize both their own gifts and those of others, the likelier it is that a gift that is suited to a specific need can be found. The ladle and book and basket and shovel are gifts not just from us but for us, and not just for us but through us to God’s world—and all the evidence indicates that it will take every one of us doing things we weren’t sure we could do in God’s grace to help this world live into “Thy Kingdom come.”

For Sept. 9, 2012: Proper 18, Year B

The Reading            Isaiah 35:4-7a

In the time of the prophet Isaiah, when Israel and Judah are two distinct kingdoms threatened by the Assyrian Empire, the king of Israel joins in a treaty with another nation—but Isaiah tells Ahaz, king of Judah, to trust in God, and the miraculously good things he prophecies in today’s reading will come to pass. The references to vengeance and terrible recompense sound like odd things about which not to fear, but the Hebrew they translate can also be rendered as ‘vindication’ and ‘restoration’.

The Response            Psalm 146

The Epistle            James 2:1-10, 14-17

Today’s psalm picked up the thread of God coming to rescue those in need. The letter from James reminds us of two things. The second is that God uses agents to bring about the justice that Isaiah prophesied: each and every one of us who bear the name of Christian. The first is that the one who plays favorites breaks the law as surely as if she had committed murder. It is a challenge to square this assertion with the gospel story of Jesus initially refusing to heal the Syrophoenician woman’s daughter.

The Gospel            Mark 7:24-37

 

Further thoughts

The claim in Isaiah’s prophecy that good things are coming to the outsiders and the admonition in the letter of James not to play favorites play disquietingly with today’s gospel.

As the gospel opens, Jesus is still mourning the recent assassination of his cousin John, who baptized him, he’s fairly new to ministry, and he’s been working very hard; Tyre, in Gentile country, may have looked like the place for a nice anonymous rest. Found at once, however, he initially and rather rudely refuses to heal a child because her mother is Syrophoenician. It is a troubling reading: why on earth would compassionate, generous Jesus blow anyone off with the comment, “It is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs”?

Many commentators assert that Jesus must be joking with the woman and that she must know it to respond as she does. A related interpretation is that he is testing her faith. Somehow, though, like D. Mark Davis (http://leftbehindandlovingit.blogspot.com/2012/09/comparing-humans-to-dogs.html), I just can’t accept that Jesus would knowingly stoop either to joshing a desperate mother or to intentional disrespect.

What if Jesus said what he thought and the woman’s response made him rethink not only her request but the scope of his ministry? This view is not original with me: see the David Henson’s blog Edges of Faith (http://www.patheos.com/blogs/davidhenson/2012/09/jesus-was-not-colorblind-racial-slurs-and-the-syrophoenician-woman-lectionary/), among others. It makes sense to me, though. Human beings are classifiers: we like to know what the categories are and what is and is not inside the boundaries, and we use what we know or think we know to construct parameters by which to judge. This bent is a strength of our cognition—emergency medicine depends crucially on being able to make snap judgments—but it is a weakness when our categories box us in. For the Jews of Jesus’ time, the inhabitants of Tyre were definitely Them, not Us. Second, insofar as historical Jesus is human and not just God through and through, he would have learned the attitudes of his culture just as we do, even as he had to learn how to operate one of these fleshy bodies just as we do.

This raises the prospect that what we see here is Jesus’ continuing education. I for one find this both comforting and challenging: if Jesus could listen to dissent and rethink things, then far be it from me to continue to shelter behind my own prior beliefs and attitudes. I still won’t match Jesus’ step for step on the way, of course—but I have much less excuse not to try.


Enter your email address to subscribe to St Alban's Lections and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2 other followers