Posts Tagged 'Psalm 1'

For Oct. 26, 2014: Proper 25, Pentecost 20, Year A

The Reading                                                           Leviticus 19:1-2,15-18

By some counts the book of Leviticus issues 613 commandments that specify how God’s people and priests are to behave. Leviticus 19:1-2, 15-18 cuts to the point: rather than judging unjustly, slandering, profiting at a neighbor’s expense, or bearing grudges, we are to behave in love toward all.

The Response                                                   Psalm 1

Psalm 1 contrasts those who follow the way of the Lord with those who are wicked. It reinforces the message of Leviticus 19:1-2, 15-18 as it carries forward the message of Psalm 23: those who follow the way of the Lord will be blessed by bearing fruit that endures.

The Epistle                                                          1 Thessalonians 2:1-8

Paul’s ministry in Thessalonica was brief and controversial; detractors accused him of dishonesty and trickery and then drove him and his group out of town. In 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8 he reminds his readers what made them believe the gospel he brought: it was spoken to please God, without impure motives, and in tender love.

The Gospel                                                               Matthew 22:34-46

The gospel of Matthew moves inexorably toward Good Friday as Jesus is challenged by the religious authorities. In Matthew 22:34-46, the Pharisees try a trick question and get an answer they were not expecting. Then Jesus asks a question about the Messiah to which they have nothing to say.

 

Further thoughts

Almost fifty years ago, up to 100,000 mostly college-age baby boomers in love beads, tie-dyed T-shirts and bell-bottomed jeans began converging on San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district for the counterculture live-in known as the “Summer of Love.” Participants were sure it was going to transform the world. It fell short of expectations, unsurprisingly: the movement hasn’t been invented that human beings can’t screw up, sometimes literally. But the Beatles’ deceptively simple “All You Need Is Love” was a smash hit of that summer of 1967 for good reason: it resonates, as the readings for Proper 25 do more profoundly, with the fact that we humans are wired to crave love, just as we are wired to be our most God-true selves when we deeply give love. As “All You Need Is Love” puts it, “There’s nothing you can make that can’t be made / No one you can save that can’t be saved / Nothing you can do but you can learn to be you in time / It’s easy / All you need is love.”

Love isn’t easy, of course—Paul brags a little to the Thessalonians about the effort he has put into approaching them in love, and Jesus’ staggeringly self-emptying sacrifice on the cross is even more stupendous if the identity of the Messiah means that the crucifixion is true not only for all time but in all time. Love in Jesus’ and Paul’s terms is certainly not just “the feels”, as one sees it on Facebook, and Lord knows our feelings can as often lead us to reject the love we need as to refuse to give the love we should. And only the Lord, through our fellow humans, can help us out of the swamps of despair that fester there. But what if, giving the glory to God, we invert the ’60s mantra from “If it feels good, do it” to “If it does good, feel it”?

For Sept. 23, 2012: Proper 20, Year B

The Reading            Proverbs 31:10-31

“The Song of the Virtuous Woman” is the name for today’s passage from the book of Proverbs. In form it is an acrostic poem—that is, its lines in Hebrew begin with successive letters of the alphabet as a memory device (and this may help explain why it is so detailed). Interestingly, the Hebrew words present this woman not merely as capable and busy but as valiant, like a warrior.

The Response            Psalm 1

The Epistle            James 3:13-4:3, 7-8a

The virtuous woman of Proverbs deals generously with the poor and speaks with wisdom and kindness. The letter from James, which is addressed to communities whose Christian unity is fraying, picks up on these themes, showing the fruit both of their presence and of their absence in our lives.

The Gospel            Mark 9:30-37

 

Further thoughts

In some respects, the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and 1970s is anticipated in the account of the virtuous woman of Proverbs. She spins fiber, weaves cloth, and makes garments, she does the shopping and manages the household, she’s strong, she buys real estate and plants a vineyard on it, she raises the children, she looks after the poor, she runs a business and markets her wares, and she’s kind and wise. In short, she does it all, apparently, with the possible exception of obsessing about her looks: it is because of all that she does that her husband is proud, her children call her happy, and we deem her virtuous.

What a winner—and what an exhausting example to try to live up to!  But the epistle and the gospel present a different perspective.

The epistle reminds us that the source of virtue—of living the truly good life—is not all the good works that we do: in fact, the good works are the fruit of submission to God, just as the wisdom is the gift of God. No gift of God is to be won through ambition or greed, for these lead only to exactly the kinds of conflicts and disputes that the epistle condemns. As the epistle points out, we don’t receive the good things God means for us if we don’t ask. The act of asking underscores that it’s not our right to demand these goodies or that privilege for being a child of God. Fortunately, it’s also not our burden to be in charge of more than God has given us.

Jesus makes a related point in the gospel. Those who need to be important work to prove their importance by the goodies with which they surround themselves and the accolades they garner. The truly great one in God’s Kingdom, however, is the one who upholds and protects the importance of others—the one who can look at little people and see them first as people. Such a person also practices gratitude and in so doing teaches it.

Which brings us back to the virtuous woman. Her children will bless her name not because she’s made them aware how much she does for them, but because her generosity and grace have taught them how to ask and how to receive—from her, from each other, and from the God from whom all blessings flow.


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