For Sept. 22, 2013: Proper 20, Year C

The Reading                                                                 Jeremiah 8:18-9:1

Jeremiah the prophet is famous for angry denunciations of wickedness. Here is a little of that—“Why have they provoked me?” says the Lord—but much more of today’s reading is grief for the misery of the people of Israel. Gilead was known for balsam from which a healing salve was made, but no such medicine seems able to help. The theme is continued in Psalm 19.

The Response                                          Psalm 79:1-9

“We have become a reproach to our neighbors, an object of scorn and derision to those around us.”

The Epistle                          Gilead,                           1 Timothy 2:1-7

The second chapter of 1 Timothy begins by nearly commanding that we pray for authority figures. In those days a Christian who refused to worship Caesar could be put to death, and many Christians must have known of people who died for that reason. This strong recommendation challenged them, and challenges us, to think about how to deal with those rulers here and abroad with whom we disagree.

The Gospel                                                                            Luke 16:1-13

“‘If then you have not been faithful with the dishonest wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches?’”

 

Further thoughts

It is not too great a stretch to say that today’s readings center on debt and responsibility. Jeremiah mourns for God’s poor people, who are afflicted because those who should have known better (which is, on some level, each of us) have lived large and idolized all manner of things—graven images like those in Exodus are named, but perhaps also the self-images that we cherish at the expense of others’ images. The psalm points fingers at the heathen for destroying the Temple and Jerusalem, the City of Peace, but time and again God’s Peace is broken through our sin, which too often includes identifying “heathen” at whom to point fingers rather than identifying wounds to which to bring balm or healing—or apology. The epistle to Timothy declines to assign blame in favor of urging prayer for everyone; not only does its “everyone” hold us to pray even for rulers whom we might consider enemies, but its “prayers” explicitly include giving God thanks for (and upholding the dignity of) those we may find most difficult. Maintaining everyone’s dignity truly is everyone’s job. Jesus’ parable is puzzling and astonishing, especially when a wage worker’s responsibility to plan alone for retirement rises while the wages to fund that retirement recede. The fact is, however, that only God truly owns anything anyway: when we die, our assets pass to others or back to God. Why not cook the books in the service of love, then? Why not freeze the interest and slash the principal on the debts we think we are owed by friends or family or the world at large? Why not be spendthrift with God’s wealth in the name of God’s love?

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