For August 12, 2012: Proper 14, Year B

The Reading            2 Samuel 18:5-15, 31-33

When the prophet Nathan confronted David about Uriah, he prophesied trouble arising from within David’s own house. It comes to pass: David’s eldest son Amnon rapes his half-sister Tamar; when David takes no action, her full brother Absalom has Amnon killed, goes into exile, is allowed to return to court but is not seen by his father, and then leads a rebellion of the “men of Israel” against the servants of David the king.

The Response            Psalm 130

The Epistle            Ephesians 4:25-5:2

Last week’s reading from the epistle to the Ephesians explained why (and, briefly, how) to live as God’s children. This week’s reading goes into specifics: we are neither to do nor to say anything that either flows from or contributes to strife and bitterness. This is excellent advice, from the first century in Ephesus to the twenty-first century in El Cajon.

The Gospel            John 6:35, 41-51

 

Further thoughts

The career of David, King of Israel, is full of ironies large and small and of intrigue and deception. The name of David’s eldest son, Amnon, means ‘faithful’: he is the one who feigns illness so he can rape his half-sister Tamar. This rape goes unpunished by King David. Tamar’s full brother, Absalom, whose name means ‘father of peace’, bides his time, throws a party for the purpose of murdering Amnon, then flees into exile. David mourns dead Amnon and then mourns the exiled Absalom. After three years David’s general Joab maneuvers David into bringing Absalom back from exile, but David will not see him. Two years later Absalom finally gets an audience with his father by torching one of Joab’s fields. At this point Absalom launches a conspiracy to lead Israel into revolt against their anointed king. David and those loyal to him, including Joab, flee across the Jordan, leaving behind two priests as spies and a foreigner who sows disinformation in Absalom’s camp. We find out that Saul’s grandson Mephibosheth, whom David has housed and protected, has thrown his lot in with Absalom when Mephibosheth’s servant Ziba brings refreshments to David’s troops along with a side dish of ambition.

Today’s reading picks up just before the decisive battle. David’s side wins; the slaughter is great, but the passage takes pains to tell us that the battle claims fewer lives than does the forest of Ephraim. At the end of the day, when the couriers come with news, David’s concern is not for how the battle has gone or how his troops have fared but rather for his rebel son.

David’s outburst on learning of Absalom’s death is often singled out as an allegory of God’s yearning love for us no matter what. It is that, to be sure. A case can also be made for the whole of David’s story as a cautionary tale about thirsting for power and love. David’s thirsts led him to tell lies, bed Bathsheba, and let his oldest son, the rapist, off the hook. The epistle and the gospel provide the corrective. When we walk in love as Christ loved us, we begin to discern that the way Jesus gives to slake our thirsts is not to grasp for power and love but truly and deeply to give them.

Advertisements

0 Responses to “For August 12, 2012: Proper 14, Year B”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s





%d bloggers like this: